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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
schools. i bought the line. i still buy the line. c-span: have you stayed with your religion all your life? >> guest: yes, i guess i have. i guess i really have -- or it stayed with me. one or the other. c-span: has it been hard? >> guest: sometimes. sometimes, yes. it's a pretty secular business. moving around the world a lot sometimes gets hard, but i think it's also your strength as well as difficult. c-span: people who are angry at the press write a lot that they don't think many members of the press are very religious. do you find that? >> guest: i don't know. you mean whether they practice a religion? c-span: we get calls here where people suggest they're even anti-religious. >> guest: yes, in a way i think for a lot of them, politics becomes their religion or broadcasting becomes their religion. c-span: conservative. >> guest: conservative, yes. i was a charter member, literally, of young americans for freedom back in the early '60s. actually it was the late '50s because i came to new york in '59. read buckley stuff. thought it was great. liked what he said. it seemed to fit in with
sense is that regardless of culture, race religion try some commonality. these essential human truth compassion and hope some moral precepts are universal. just go and somebody is another variation he said in the speech that made famous in the 2004 keynote address at the democratic national convention in boston, where he said there's a red states blue states, but the united states. he presented himself as the personification of that notion. his presidency has been a rude awakening in terms of how far you can take that. so he has been dealing with that. the promise and frustrations of that idea ever sense. as i'm sure we'll both be experiencing the telephone calls, for the show. >> host: your book ends in 1989, "barack obama: the story." he said there's another volume coming? >> guest: added y2k committed to 40 years of robert caro, so assertive cat that on the down low, but i had every intention and i've done a lot of reporting that the later years, which influences the book even though they're not in it. and i don't want to do a quickie. i tried a rate for history documents coming o
. >> their brothers in al qaeda, our brothers in religion. they're here with us overseeing things in the same area we are working and our relationship with them is one of muslim. by what right could be expelled them? as a service to france or america? >> at this hideout in another northern town, tuareg rebels say andaeda are proxy's of mali algeria, utilized for years to isolate tuareg communities and prevent the appearance of a tuareg state. >> the main enemy of the mali government is the tuareg. this is the belief system upon which the malian state is based, that the primary interest -- enemy is the tuareg. since the birth of mali, mali had taken the lead just like the french colonialists and the tuareg as ours has never in fact and part of mali. >> tuareg rebels are scattered, trying to regroup. they don't have the logistics and high-tech care of their rivals or the hundreds of millions in cash that al qaeda has from hostage ransoms. what they have is a seemingly endless supply of young men ready to die for the cause. 50-year-old self-determination struggle of the stars indigenous people. >> that
state. libertine social policies that a client of religion and incredible, incredible selfishness. that's what's on display here in america. if traditional people don't stay in -- stand up we will become sweden. reaction from our barack and hard place duo here now monica crowley and alan colmes. who punched you? >> it was a very ugly christmas dinner at the crowley household this year. bam, right in the kisser. >> what really happened? >> i'm auditioning for the real housewives of beverly hills. that's what's going on. >> what really happened to you? >> i looked like cass tell yesterday. >> bill: you snell. were you drunk. >> no. i fell. >> bill: for no reason? >> i was thinking of what i'm going to say next on the factor and boom. >> bill: you look like mickey rosenbacher. you would say you are a traditional conservative. >> i think so. >> bill: i'm surprised that there are in america very few traditional leaders, would you agree with that? nobody to rally around. it's a scattered tradition. correct? >> there are some obviously in the churches. some trying to lead a traditional cultura
is the redneck americans clinging to their guns and religion. 99% of the gun violence is in the city. >> bob: they have three strikes you're out. >> greg: i'm talking about a federal law for handgun crime. why isn't omar abdel-rahman rahg about the 500 people that died in chicago. >> eric: he is inses tent to use the newtown massacre as the crisis that is not to be wasted. >> bob: not a bad idea either. the kids and you are talking actually about the national rifle -- freddie how many dead kids in philadelphia? >> kimberly: now you want to ban handguns? you're liberal kama sutro. so many positions -- >> eric: on that note, what are the odds the media does their job in the next four years and reports the truth about the obama administration? we'll place our wagers next. ♪ ♪ [ ship horn blows ] no, no, no! stop! humans. one day we're coming up with the theory of relativity, the next... not so much. but that's okay -- you're covered with great ideas like optional better car replacement from liberty mutual insurance. total your car and we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. lea
clinging to their guns and religion. 99% of the gun violence is in the city. >> bob: they have three strikes you're out. >> greg: i'm talking about a federal law for handgun crime. why isn't omar abdel-rahman rahg about the 500 people that died in chicago. >> eric: he is inses tent to use the newtown massacre as the crisis that is not to be wasted. >> bob: not a bad idea either. the kids and you are talking actually about the national rifle -- freddie how many dead kids in philadelphia? >> kimberly: now you want to ban handguns? you're liberal kama sutro. so many positions -- >> eric: on that note, what are the odds the media does their job in the next four years and reports the truth about the obama administration? we'll place our wagers next. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> greg: so "usa today," the nation's official place mat for free continental breakfas breakfast, has not one, but two articles on how president obama should cope with the future scandals. the headline, similar. if you are falling over yourself to help the president to greatness, you can be forgiven for repetition. what are hea
"going clear" the author puts scientology and its status aas a religion under a microscope. wright focuses on scientology's obsession with celebrity through its most famous defector, writer/director paul hagus. he won two oscars for "crash." he left the church after his daughters coming out as lesbian forced him to take a look at scientology, he discovered accounts on websites about children working for hours on end, this from nbc's "rock center." >> it's horrible treatment these kids had, terrible, they're made to work so often and all day long and these terrible conditions. [ bleep ] them for that. yeah, they should be taken down for that. >> reporter: in a statement the church says it diligently followed and continues to follow all child labor laws in every state or country in which it operates. the church says complaints about children being forced to perform chores for long hours are unfounded. haggis says he found himself in trouble with the church when he crossed its biggest celebrity, tom cruise, who had worked for years to recruit director steven spielberg into the church,
in those da y when given the -- between franco and the vatican, which made serviery other religion illegal begin that chapter with a funny stormed i am in a bar in northen spain and the guys are trying to teach me how to pour the wonderful cider, the hard cider which perhaps you know -- you hold the bottle this wg your head, you have a glass with a very big opened last pointing out and the cider is supposed to hit the outside and bounce in and iite trying to do that and most of it is running down my pants all over the floor. little bit is going into the glass and one of the guys sa y to me -ke twe are pretty well drunk by this time and one of the unn y sg catholic or atheist? those seemed to be the only possibilities. i said no, i am neither a catholic nor an atheist. no kidding? you must be protestant. why would you think that? servierybody an american governt -- that is not true either. john kennedy -- so i said, what are you? i am jewish. you couldn't be jewish. he ghy couldn't i be it? r aou don't have any horns. i joked, i said i had some cut off when i came into the ford yn service.
. it was the first time discrimination had ever been used in the distinction between race, religion, etc., discrimination in the fact as opposed to judging the size of eggs or something, being discriminate. and so by giving it a name, by giving it a fame it started -- a name it started to have it own life. the ability of a president to name something, i'm jumping ahead a little bit, but in 1934 franklin d. roosevelt was going to give his annual address to congress and was from day one in this country the president at the beginning of the year would give an address to the nation and to the congress. and roosevelt in 1934 says, oh, i'll give it a name, calls it the state of the union. so a lot of these terms which are sort of created by presidents we think are, um, they are from day one. in fact, they're ones that have been added later. and, again, some of them are just wonderful. i mean, i'll just jump to a couple. zachary taylor created the term "first lady." he applied it to dolly madison. that was the first anyone had ever used that term. he said the first lady of the land. benjamin ha
makes religion into an instrument of hatred like j.b. stoner, there are plenty of those. they are near the top of the list. c-span: here is the book. second in the three volume series by taylor branch. this one is called "pillar of fire america in the king years 1963-1965." thank you. >> guest: thank you, brian. >>> you are watching book tv on c-span2. tonight we are at the national press club in washington, d.c. for their annual authors night and we are pleased to be joined here by robert merry who is the author of "where they stand the american presidents in the eyes of voters and historians." mr. merry, do we tend to like our presidents? >> i think the american people love their presidents. they love the presidency. but when they have a president that has not succeeded to the judge a failure, they vary on sentimentally cast them aside and that is our system to read that is what they were invited to do by the founders and by the constitution. >> do we have a short patience? >> we understand the constitution gave them hiring and firing authority over these guys every four years. so th
of religion. and so we have this enormous, tragic history that all of us confront from whatever our backgrounds are whether we're white, black, hispanic, asian, whether we're muslim, jew or christian. the notion that, in fact, in the words of a great writer who happened to win a nobel prize, william faulkner, he said the past is never dead and buried, it isn't even past. and i think that all of us are confronting constantly our history. we're confronting the history of slavery in this country. we're confronting the history and problems that arose as a consequence of colonialism. we're confronting those scars of violence and oppression and struggle and difficulty and hope not only on the larger canvas of history, but also within our own families. and for me it was not entirely obvious how, in fact, i was going to be able to integrate and pull together all those different strands in my life. so part of my challenge growing up was to figure out how do i function as someone who is black but also has white blood in me, how do i function as somebody who with is american and takes pride an
. i am speaking of that force which all of the great religions have seen as the supreme unifying principle of life. love is somehow the key that unlocks the door which leads to ultimate reality. this hindu-muslim-christian- jewish-buddhist belief about ultimate reality is beautifully summed up in the first epistle of saint john: "let us love one another (yes), for love is god. (yes) and every one that loveth is born of god and knoweth god. he that loveth not knoweth not god, for god is love. if we love one another, god dwelleth in us and his love is perfected in us." let us hope that this spirit will become the order of the day. we can no longer afford to worship the god of hate or bow before the altar of retaliation. the oceans of history are made turbulent by the ever-rising tides of hate. history is cluttered with the wreckage of nations and individuals that pursued this self-defeating path of hate. as arnold toynbee says: "love is the ultimate force that makes for the saving choice of life and good against the damning choice of death and evil. therefore the first hope in our
fugelsang isn't the be all end all when it comes to religion. >> indeed i am not. >> stephanie: but i take his word over everyone else. part of my thinks jesus wouldn't be against being able to defend themselves, but part of me says he would say guns are bad. john is living proof that sanity can go hand in hand. the world needs more people like him and all after you sexy liberals. i agree melissa. >> john fugelsang is the greatest thing ever in the history of the world. >> nope, nope nope nope. >> here is the thing, yeah jesus of course would support sane gun control. jesus about doing more with your life than putting in 30 rounds so you would not have to reload during gun massacre. our gun-loving friends would try to use this one passage from luke to say that jesus actually supported guns and it's hilarious because there were no guns in jesus's time. and jesus said when i sent you out did you lack anything? nothing they said. and they are saying that that is proof that jesus said go out and buy a gun because he said sell your cloak and buy a sword. >> stephanie: go ahead a
in that religion. i say you buy it, you own it and be proud of it. i agree. thank you. i do agree. i do. however, it's not that somebody tells me i can't bring it home. it's just i'm almost embarrassed by my own fabric gluttony. i hide it from myself. i think if i don't show anybody then i really didn't buy another $300 worth of fabric. but i have to have it. i have to have it. i have to tell you something. mary lou, the truth is i am like lucky i found fabric before drugs or i would be in some gutter somewhere. i'm telling you, that's how bad it is. i have a jones for cotton. wow, i turn my back and look what happens. i know. they never saw us coming. i've been standing off set and it looks fantastic. you never even looked at it? i've been looking as it's built over here and it's beautiful. should we tell the other group now? i have my hat ready. what do you have up your sleeve? you have to go like this. put you right here. all right, pretend you never saw this. are you ready to show something, miss burns? yes. ta-da!!! awesome! are we good or what! you mean you're d
at them. it's our secular religion. that's what this day is. think of what an extraordinary moment it is. a person is a private citizen. they take that oath. they become the most powerful person in the world. they're finished. they go out. they go back out. and they're a private person again. almost no other country in the world is that possible. it's an extraordinary moment. >> i've been disappointed. a lot of people have been disappointed. if you read "the new york times" this weekend, how the president managed the office on a personal basis with members on the hill on both sides. are you hopeful that this president has learned from some of the mistakes of the first term and he's going to reach out more aggressively? even to his own party on the hill. >> well, i think he's a reflective person. he does think he's talked more than most leaders about what he did wrong the first term. that's not usual that these characters admit it and he has. i'm not sure how far he'll get reaching out to republicans. he's tried more than we know. they just didn't come sometimes. the democr
. come out of religion's long-standing deception. with the 40-day general strike for freedom when be our royal reception. let us shine a light on the common denominator which, to those familiar and comprehending be m.k.-ultra signatures with all these mass shootings is the connection. also connecting to dennis kucinich's current effort assisting gulf war vets from '92 to 2002, over 200,000 vets, death by vaccines, murdered by genocide, by vaccines designed by the likes of dr. maurice wholen. my knowledge be firsthand. i have been privy to conversations with these people throughout the 1980's. i am available to be talked to by mike mcguire. one last sentence. detectives james rothstein has often stated that certain people never get prosecuted because of their connections. i hope this is not the case. thank you. >> next. you've not been called, sir. you need to go back and take a seat. we'll call you when it's time. >> hi. i'm hugh fike sr. i live in petaluma. thanks for holding this forum. i am glad to hear you mention the high-grade shotguns of the aristocracy uses in england. i hope it
the barriers that separated those of different race and region and religion, and where there had been mistrust, built unity, with a respect for diversity, that we had found productive work for those able to perform it, that we had strengthened the american family, which is the basis of our society, that we had ensured respect for the law and equal treatment under the law, for the weak and the powerful, for the rich and the poor, and that we had enabled our people to be proud of their own government once again. i would hope that the nations of the world might say that we had built a lasting peace, based not on weapons of war but on international policies which reflect our own most precious values. these are not just my goals -- and they will not be my accomplishments, but the affirmation of our nation's continuing moral strength and our belief in an undiminished, ever-expanding american dream. thank you very much. >> here's for from the list of inauguration we found from the academy. polk was in 1845. buchanan inauguration was the first known to be photographed. during lincoln's second inaugura
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

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